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Potential ARFID Treatment

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This is a recent story/quote that is very hopeful for families looking for treatment options. I’ll add Dr. Hyche to the list pf potential treatment options here as well. The author is a lovely person who immigrated to the US and allowed me to include it here.
“My 9 year old son has gone through 6 weeks treatment with Dr. James Hyche, Who has been doing it for 22 years. Before he went to the program, my son only ate carbohydrates. After the program, he is able to eat 30 kinds of new foods. I wrote the story about fight with insurance company and his weekly treatment before the intensive program. It has worked for my 9 year old son. We were also asked to do an interview with USA today, but my son does not want to disclose his name so we rejected the interview.
I should say it was hard at the beginning and Dr. Hyche made him less harder as he broke down it to tiny steps.
The truth is after he went through the initial phobia of new food, he does enjoy so much about at least half  of the the 30 newly added food. He can handle the rest of them pretty well. It is all about the exposure. When one goes to the program, the food for training are called non-proffered food, but some of them have turned to preferred food only the time as he enjoys so much now. Tonight he ate fish fillet and baked mozzarella cheese which were unthinkable. When he asked what the dinner was, for the answer you could hear if he loved it or not. For example, he heared it was cheese stick (non-preferred during the program), he said exuberantly: YES! (he loves it now!) What a transformation!
The intensive program has been a life saver for our son and our lives. Now we can find restaurants to eat when traveling and he can eat with his teammates after the ball games. We can not thank enough for that!”
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A Good Day for ARFID

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At this year’s Eating Disorders: State of the Art Treatment 2016 symposium in Baltimore on April 9th, our number one supporter Dr. Nancy Zucker will be presenting The Phenomenology and Management of Aviodant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) and a subsequent breakout session. While this is not the kind of talk a typical ARFIDer might attend and find helpful, it’s still a great day for ARFIDers because it means more and more health professionals will be educated on our behalf. Thank you Dr. Zucker for spreading the word. It’s a marvelous thing.

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For improving ARFID is Timing Everything?

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As I’ve dove into finding stories of others who have had success improving their ARFID I’ve noticed that pretty much everyone has had to try numerous methods to help introduce new foods to their diet. There’s no one method that’s worked for everyone. I’m wondering if the timing of the therapy is as, if not more, important than the therapy itself. Is it possible that no matter how beneficial a treatment could be, if our minds and bodies are not ready for change than maybe none will happen? It took me three tries with hypnotherapy before it started working for me. Why didn’t it work the first two? Would other therapies have worked in those two cases? I have no idea. Its just my opinion but I think there needs to be an alignment between trying a therapy and being ready to succeed.

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Should ARFID Sufferers Be Wary of Some Treatments?

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This is an interesting article from the New York Times that doesn’t specifically mention ARFID but points out how there are many ‘for profit’ treatment centers¬† for Eating Disorders popping up. What’s really concerning is when those centers become “business models” and are purchased by private equity groups who are less interested in helping patients than making a higher rate of return on their investment. I’m not trying to discourage ARFIDers from considering these but please do your research before investing in a treatment.

Centers to Treat Eating Disorders are Growing, and Raising Concerns